yummyinmytumbly:

Shrimp Zucchini Pasta Puttanesca

yagazieemezi:

Beautiful children in Anakao, Madagascar

by Nicolas Mithois

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

gang0fwolves:

heartsdontbreakeven:

The truth

this man was speaking so much truth, i really wish someone would interview him

In various schools in Uganda, and some other parts of Africa, children as young as five are punished for speaking African languages, indigenous languages and mother tongues at school. The modes of punishment differ. The most common one in Uganda is wearing a dirty sack until you meet someone else speaking their mother tongue and then you pass the sack on to them. In some schools, there are specific pupils and students tasked with compiling lists of fellow pupils and students speaking mother tongues. This list is then handed over to a teacher responsible for punishing these language rule-breakers. According to Gilbert Kaburu, some schools have aprons that read: “Shame on me, I was speaking vernacular” handed over to an offender of the No Vernacular rule, who then is tasked with finding the next culprit to give the apron. Most of the punishments, in their symbolism emphasise the uselessness of the African languages.

Commenting on a photo of two children in Uganda wearing dirty sacks as punishment for speaking their mother tongues, Zimbabwean writer, Tendai Huchu says:

“That sums up our self loathing and inferiority complex. Junot Diaz once said we do a better job of enforcing white supremacy ourselves than white supremacists ever could. I should add, notice how the punishment consists of wearing sack-cloth. The image is telling. You are rags if you speak your own language.”

Halima Hosh, agreeing with Tendai Huchu opines:

“It’s outrageous. What a slave mentality that a colonial language is considered higher or better/more worth than their own local language. Unbelievable. Do the Europeans learn any African language in school? No. Why not? Because we are not proud of our heritage, not proud of our languages, not proud of Black African history. These teachers need to be fired.

This is a serious problem. Read the entire article here: http://thisisafrica.me/schools-punishing-children-speaking-african-languages/ (via linglife)

Languages don’t generally become endangered because people just don’t really feel like speaking them anymore: it’s often much more brutal. And similar methods for repressing indigenous languages happen all over the world: this reminded me of a memorable quote from a man in Alaska “Whenever I speak Tlingit, I can still taste the soap.” 

(via allthingslinguistic)

Fake it til you can’t anymore and fall apart

alexstrangler:

Ice cream flower on @luasuicide

alexstrangler:

Ice cream flower on @luasuicide

luxnplush:

bolinsbiceps:

waiting for the “steal her look” trend to die down

image

image

plantgranny:

props to the plants that grow outta concrete u guys tryin so hard

youngblackandvegan:

ecstasymodels:

Crayola
Glam Chronicles @glamchronicles

glory

youngblackandvegan:

ecstasymodels:

Crayola

Glam Chronicles @glamchronicles

glory

(Source : glamchronicles)

Right now, I’m waiting for an email letting me know if I’ve got the job I desperately want, plus a text from a friend who is constantly too busy for me.

Assuming the worst, feeling shit.

the-goddamazon:

zzbbtt:

i dont think i’ll ever stop reblogging this shit

If I never reblog this, assume I’m dead.

(Source : porndirector)

humansofnewyork:

"I started working in the fields when I was five. After that, I worked construction for thirty years. Eight years ago, I was between jobs and I wanted to do something useful, so I started going to school. It took me 8 years to get through middle school, because I could only go to classes when work was slow, but I finished with a 9.3 out of 10. Now I’m moving on to high school. The toughest part is Algebra."
(Mexico City, Mexico)

humansofnewyork:

"I started working in the fields when I was five. After that, I worked construction for thirty years. Eight years ago, I was between jobs and I wanted to do something useful, so I started going to school. It took me 8 years to get through middle school, because I could only go to classes when work was slow, but I finished with a 9.3 out of 10. Now I’m moving on to high school. The toughest part is Algebra."

(Mexico City, Mexico)

radivs:

'Under Mother Protection' by Sergei Gladyshev